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Since 1996, the Benton Foundation has provided free, daily summaries of articles concerning the quickly-changing telecommunications policy landscape. Since September 2005, we've used individual stories to help track developments in telecommunications legislation, the media ownership debate and efforts to ensure universal broadband.

Headlines

Benton Foundation provides free, daily summaries of articles concerning the quickly-changing telecommunications policy landscape.

FCC chairman says reports of network neutrality's death are 'flat out wrong'

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler insists that there has been "no turnaround in policy" concerning Open Internet rules and calls April 23’s reports on new network neutrality rules "flat out wrong."

Network Neutrality Running Out Of Lives, Which Will Affect Ours

Location:
San Jose Mercury News, 750 Ridder Park Drive, San Jose, CA, 95190, United States

Open Internet. Net neutrality. Whatever you want to call it, it appears to be dying. And if you’re wondering whether you should mourn its death, might as well get that black suit ready.

Welcome to Comcast Country

Location:
Philadelphia, PA, United States

Comcast argues that its acquisition of Time warner Cable will not decrease competition among cable television or broadband Internet providers because the two companies do not directly compete -- though the reason for that is that they already maintain virtual monopolies in many of their service areas. In Comcast’s case, that monopoly is predicated upon exerting overwhelming political control.

The promise of a faster Internet for Los Angeles

Location:
Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, CA, United States

AT&T's announcement that it might extend ultra-high-speed broadband service to Los Angeles and dozens of other communities across the country was greeted with no small amount of skepticism from the digital punditocracy. And there does seem to be a bit of gamesmanship going on between AT&T and Google, which has also made a habit of announcing potential, rather than actual, deployments of gigabit-speed Internet services.

3.5 GHz: New Ideas in the “Innovation Band”

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States

In a speech in March at the Brookings Institution, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler issued a challenge -- let’s confront change in spectrum policy and reorient our perspective from what was to what can be. Now, the FCC is leading by example. The Commission is issuing a detailed proposal for a new service in the 3.5 GHz Band -- the Citizens Broadband Radio Service -- representing a watershed for innovative spectrum sharing policies. 3.5 GHz is an ideal “innovation band.”

Could the Comcast-Time Warner merger actually be a good thing for online TV?

Location:
USA, United States

The news that Dish aims to launch its online TV service this summer highlighted an interesting factoid: In some cases, big media mergers actually do foster competition -- as long as they come with a solid side of regulatory-imposed conditions, that is.

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Benton Foundation provides free, daily summaries of articles concerning the quickly-changing telecommunications policy landscape.

FCC chairman says reports of network neutrality's death are 'flat out wrong'

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler insists that there has been "no turnaround in policy" concerning Open Internet rules and calls April 23’s reports on new network neutrality rules "flat out wrong."

Network Neutrality Running Out Of Lives, Which Will Affect Ours

Location:
San Jose Mercury News, 750 Ridder Park Drive, San Jose, CA, 95190, United States

Open Internet. Net neutrality. Whatever you want to call it, it appears to be dying. And if you’re wondering whether you should mourn its death, might as well get that black suit ready.

Welcome to Comcast Country

Location:
Philadelphia, PA, United States

Comcast argues that its acquisition of Time warner Cable will not decrease competition among cable television or broadband Internet providers because the two companies do not directly compete -- though the reason for that is that they already maintain virtual monopolies in many of their service areas. In Comcast’s case, that monopoly is predicated upon exerting overwhelming political control.

The promise of a faster Internet for Los Angeles

Location:
Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, CA, United States

AT&T's announcement that it might extend ultra-high-speed broadband service to Los Angeles and dozens of other communities across the country was greeted with no small amount of skepticism from the digital punditocracy. And there does seem to be a bit of gamesmanship going on between AT&T and Google, which has also made a habit of announcing potential, rather than actual, deployments of gigabit-speed Internet services.

3.5 GHz: New Ideas in the “Innovation Band”

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States

In a speech in March at the Brookings Institution, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler issued a challenge -- let’s confront change in spectrum policy and reorient our perspective from what was to what can be. Now, the FCC is leading by example. The Commission is issuing a detailed proposal for a new service in the 3.5 GHz Band -- the Citizens Broadband Radio Service -- representing a watershed for innovative spectrum sharing policies. 3.5 GHz is an ideal “innovation band.”

Could the Comcast-Time Warner merger actually be a good thing for online TV?

Location:
USA, United States

The news that Dish aims to launch its online TV service this summer highlighted an interesting factoid: In some cases, big media mergers actually do foster competition -- as long as they come with a solid side of regulatory-imposed conditions, that is.

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